Creeping plants or “creepers” are generally considered to be small, viny plants that grow close to the ground. They are also referred to as procumbent plants.

In cases where their vines are long enough and you wish to have them climb a structure, you need to guide them (train them) and secure them to a support if they are to achieve much height at all. In this sense, they differ from “climbers,” which are another class of vine. For example, you could tie the vines to the structure loosely with twine. Even some plants that tend naturally to grow more upright often need such help.

But most true creepers are smaller plants that seem to simply to crawl “on their bellies” along the ground, these usually make good ground covers. You should not force-train them to climb, because they are just too short for that. The longest vines belong to creeping myrtle and creeping juniper plants. But do not be fooled by common names: Some plants with “creeper” in their names are vigorous climbers, including Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia).

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